Imagine you are standing atop the Grand Canyon...

What do you do?

Many will stand in awe and silence; others will embrace their loved one as they share the moment.

BUT WHAT EVERYONE WILL CERTAINLY DO IS TAKE A PHOTOGRAPH

And in the 21st Century that now means taking a photo, putting it on Instagram and providing a hip appropriate hashtag all in less than 3 minutes.

In fact every major event of recent times, whether it be security personal assaulting plane passengers or the momentous #Women’sMarch, is now simultaneously recorded and uploaded to the internet via social media.

AND WHAT IS SOCIAL MEDIA BUT A TOOL TO PRESERVE?

preserving the present selfie

My early year attempts of recording my journey with a selfie - note the date in the bottom left corner - pre-Smartphone era

All of your publicly shared photos, locations, reactions and thoughts are all preserved on the internet.

Moments that are recorded in the present, in real-time, act as an archive of your public life.

The Pixelrealism movement understands this new reality by reproducing society’s constant need to preserve the present of our modern day realities.

THE DESIRE TO SAVE AND REMEMBER THE PRESENT HAS BEEN AROUND FOR MOST OF RECORDED HUMAN HISTORY

In the past 100 years we have gotten far more visual with this desire, thanks to photography and video, but none of these have come close to offering a really immersive historical experience.

For a deeper immersion, you could always visit ancient ruins or participate in a historical reenactment – but these still only offer a limited view.

When it comes to recording our own lives, we can come a bit closer to reliving history because we evoke our own memories of actually being there through selfies and videos captured mostly on our phones.

BUT WHAT ABOUT THE PLACES AROUND US? 

And the history that they hold which is usually hidden from view?

If you consider the ambition of Toronto based virtual reality innovator The Third Fate - we would find more opportunities to immerse ourselves in the past if we got better at capturing and saving the present.

The award winning design studio has used its 360 degree capture technology recently to preserve once-in-a-lifetime experiences like artist Bjarke Ingel’s ‘BIG Maze’ as well as everyday cityscapes like Manhattan’s Columbus Circle.

If you think about it, this desire to use technology to record the present so we might experience and enjoy it far into the future isn’t that different than the reason any of us record our lives through selfies and videos.

THERE IS A BEAUTIFUL POWER IN THE PRESERVED PRESENT...

'Just For Laughs' by James Jarvis

The philosophy of pixelrealism is how we relate and interact with social media as a documentation for important events: for EXAMPLE 'Just For Laughs' (oil on canvas) captures our growing fear of the increasing military escalation of North Korea.

And this DNA of Pixelrealism is about much more than just recording an experience.

These artworks may be able to help us make sure we don’t leave the past behind as well.

Drones, virtual and augmented reality, 3D imagery, and cutting edge design are all being applied to preserve the past in various ways.

The beautiful side effect is that these initiatives are also making the past easier to experience and access on demand, often alongside the preset.

This is what Pixelrealism is pushing towards – a world where we can access, experience and learn from our shared present more easily and with a new level of immersiveness, insight and connection.

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